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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  March 4, 2011 6:00am-9:00am EST

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number one story on msnbc.com, 575-pound heart attack grill spokesman dies at 29. this is a restaurant outside phoenix. if you want to quick female. >> anna writes three weeks ago my contractor tore out my kitchen. this morning he finally returned to get an early start on the renovations. >> people having their kitchens ripped out, awoken at 5:00 a.m. "morning joe" starts right now. as a nation, you know, i look back in history, in some of the worst governments we've ever
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had. one of the first things they did, they went over the trade unions. hitler didn't want unions, stalin didn't want independent unions, mubarak didn't want independent unions. i'm not comparing what is happening in wisconsin to hitler and stalin but it's a positive force in society that creates a middle class and protects our freedom. >> good morning. it's friday, march 4th. with us on set, msnbc contributor mike barnicle and msnbc political analyst and visiting professor, at nyu, he just got sanctioned for taking his class out to watch a live sex act. we speak of harold ford jr. and in washington, -- sorry, harold. that was a northwestern professor. >> pat buchanan and host for
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"andrea mitchell reports" andrea mitchell. you can't compare scott walker to hitler and stalin and then say i'm not comparing scott walker to hitler and stalin. >> full disclosure. we love jerry brown. >> we need a we lot them, but -- dot, dot, dot segment. this say step off the bus. what was that sandra bullock movie? >> i don't know her catalog as well as i should. >> this is "speed." mike, get off at the next bus stop. we love you, man but brown, come on. >> he might be having a reaction to the fact that the cleveland indians are so terrible this year. >> they suck. >> they have to stop this. everybody has to stop this. >> come on, senator. >> you can wave the bloody flag
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of adolf hitler and say nothing here. harold ford jr.? maybe, maybe in '95 i might have done that. i don't remember on the house floor. it was the summer of love. what do you remember from the summer of love? seriously did you ever compare political opponents to stalin or hitler. >> people get excited, passionate and go overboard. he tried to step back. he said i'm not comparing what's happening -- in fairness he said that. i think he tried to make a point. >> i'm not going to compare scott walker to a man who killed 30 million of his own people but scott walker is doing the same thing as a man who killed 30 million of his own people. >> he's my friend. i love him. hope he gets re-elected this year. >> what's in the water out
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there? >> i'm afraid what's in the water. could we put a moratorium on all references to hitler, genocide, stallen? you can't say that and say i don't mean to make that comparison. these are words that just can't be used. >> pat buchanan on another one of those we love him but, mike huckabee. >> oh, man. >> what's going on with our good friend mike huckabee? is he selling books? if he's selling books, that's fine but it just causes a problem. >> i think he just misspoke on the kenya thing. apparently in his book it mentions indonesia and stuff. the natalie portman, i'm not familiar with how she got into a family way, joe, but this is -- >> this is a murphy brown episode. >> you remember murphy brown? murphy brown got pregnant by her former husband.
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>> yes, exactly. >> i couldn't understand that one. >> and this one as willie's been saying all morning, it's an engaged person. listen, i'll tell you this. i think huckabee, if you see the whole thing he said, the fact of models in hollywood that are picked up by folks who can't do those kinds of things and survive, i think the point is very valid. >> yes, i just don't know what he's doing. >> speaking of sex -- >> uh-oh. >> did you guys in washington, i don't know if the rest of you picked this up, pat and andrea, did you see, it's below the fold on "the washington post," a study on sex in america, study finds abstinence on rise in teens, early 20s. i've been saying for some time and some time looking at my kids and their friends over the past few years -- >> right. >> i've noticed a, in the age of
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pornography where a kid who is 9 or 10 is exposed to stuff we weren't exposed to until we were in college or even later, a more conservative generation regarding sex. and here it says the number of teens and people in the early 20s who remain abstinent goes well into the early -- it goes close to a third, mike barnicle. this is a dramatic shift. our youth are becoming more conservative when it comes to abstinence and sex. i think it's a reaction to all those images they're bombarded with at an early age. >> i think part of it, i think you put your finger on part of it, is the unbelievable access that kids have, everyone has, to stuff on the internet from the age of 8, 9, 10 years of age. i am the wrong guy to talk to about this, joe. i was raised with a deep belief and taught that sex is more dangerous than the third rail. >> right.
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>> just don't go anywhere near it. >> and so of course you jumped in head first. >> yes. >> which again maybe the point, pat buchanan. conservatives have been bemoaning -- you talked about a culture war. it's something obviously my parents were concerned about and we were concerned about growing up. but you look at this study, america's youth are becoming more conservative. william bennett talked about it some time ago. >> right. >> i'm sorry, go ahead, pat. >> i think that's right, joe. they are becoming more socially conservative and traditionalists. you notice, for example, on the pro-life side, joe, they are more conservative. >> they are. >> than the generation ahead of them. and maybe it's the technology. maybe, as mike's talking and you were talking, it's the experience of looking at their parents' generation. it seems to be a modest move in the direction of social
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conservatism. >> it's interesting. it cuts both ways, of course. you've said this as well, pat. andrea, let me throw it to you. it's sort of a mixed message. i have been finding with younger kids that i talk to and i define kids as anybody under 47, that they are becoming more conservative on the abortion issue but, of course, more progressive on gay rights. so it's sort of cutting both ways. it's a fascinating trend. >> i think people are become more libertarian, if you will, on the subject of gay rights, not just young people but the data show that people all across the country, that we have really moved in a strong direction there. away from being judgmental about other people. but when it comes to sex and young people, i'm probably not the best judge but i would think that probably the economy, the recession, the anxieties that kids face, they're worried about
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a lot of things, the millennial generation in college are worried about getting through, finding a job. they may not feel as much freedom, if you will. >> andrea, i love you and with all due respect, willie and i didn't think about the gdp when we were 17 years old. >> but i'm just saying when i'm on campuses kids are asking about jobs and about the economy. >> i know, i was just -- >> if you think back to the last couple of years what they've been through. but you're right. >> bad times do make people more conservative in many ways in their choices. >> one of the big things that underpins this study, i haven't read this story, is what was there with regard to sex when we were all growing up, no matter how young you are or how old you are? there was a mystery about it. there's no more mystery about it. >> and that's probably it. seriously, i think for a lot of teenage boys, the first time they may have seen back in the
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'60s, '70s and early part of the '80s, a female body was when they saw playboy when they were 14 or 15. >> yes. >> you take the mystery away with the gross, graphic depictions that have bombarded our children since they were very young and after all, it's just like, god, give me a break. >> or if you're in harold's class. >> or if you're in harold's class. the meaning of life, ever see the meaning of life when the school master brought the people in to have sex and they were falling asleep? that may be what's happening. >> joe, you know, i think mike touches on a good point. back there certainly in our generation, it was a far more important and serious matter in the '50s than it was say after that sexual revolution hit the campuses in the '60s and in the '70s where it became sort of a, you know, take it or leave it. it wasn't as important, i think,
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later on as it was in those days. >> right, right. >> willie? >> i think maybe that's coming back. >> hey, joe -- >> we should point out that teen pregnancy rates have dipped over the last couple of years. don't get me wrong, it's still a scourge that is eating away part of our country. >> trends are reversing. i want to talk about libya and john boehner going there on the front page of "the wall street journal." one more cultural issue we in new york are reading today, i want you and pat buchanan, the two practicing catholics here, to claw each other's eyes out. cuomo snubs bishops after vatican slaps live-in gal pal. mike barnicle, of course, the vatican has stopped andrew cuomo or governor from taking communion. he has responded by refusing to meet the bishops when they come up to albany. this is going to be a little battle. and are the bishops in the
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right? andrew cuomo in the right? >> i think the bishops in the catholic church, i'm a practicing catholic, as you point out, have a little bit more to worry about within their own house rather than commenting upon what lapsed catholics or fallen catholics as we would define andrew cuomo as because of his divorce about their lifestyles and who can and cannot receive communion, whom is living with whom, they have quite enough to deal with with regard to the sexual scandal that's just rippled through the catholic church. >> pat buchanan, what do you say? >> i'm on the side of -- i don't know if that was archbishop dolan up there in new york? >> yes. >> i would be on his side. manufacture these, down here in washington, d.c., it's concern over catholics who are giving scandal to the faithful by supporting, basically, pro-abortion judges and pro-abortion policies. if the church is going to have any moral authority, it has to
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speak out when someone egregiously, if you will, is violating those standards. i'm on the side of the bishops on this one, joe. >> mike, what do you think? >> the church obviously not only has a perfect rate but it's the church's obligation to define morality and ask catholics to practice the tenents of their religion. going outside the lines of that, commenting upon who governor cuomo is living with, please, stay out thereof. >> andrea, let me ask you about what's happening in libya, obviously president obama is publicly calling on gadhafi to give up power. take a listen to what the president said yesterday, then i want your response. >> be very unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his country. it is good for his people. it's the right thing to do. so there are a whole range of
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options, military and nonmilitary that we're examining and we'll be making these decisions based on what's best for the libyan people and how can we make sure we're minimizing the harm to innocent civilians during this process. throughout all this, we will continue to send a clear message that it's time for gadhafi to go. >> andrea, talk about the president leaving the military option on the table yesterday. >> he's leaving it on the table but he did not pick up the reference the question specifically about the no-fly zone. what they don't want to do is signal this is somehow an american or western initiative and permit gadhafi to say, as he's tried to say, that it was not a home-grown rebellion. they don't want to put their fingerprints all over it, at the same time, they want to have the military option to use specifically for humanitarian and rescue operations. the no-fly zone is very much a challenge for them.
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you heard robert gates the other day saying there's been too much loose talk about this. certainly what we heard from the state department, from hillary clinton and from u.n. ambassador susan rice was much more pro-active about it. but gates, admiral mullen, they really do not, the pentagon does not want to take this on and nato is resistant to it as well. they're demanding a u.n. resolution and russia and china would push back against that. >> we're in afghanistan, we have over 100,000 troops there, 50,000 troops in iraq. u.s. troops are spread across this globe. come on, we can't police another country, can we? >> no, we can't. robert gates is making more sense than anybody in this city. he said what are you talking about? that would require to us hit radar sites, missile sites, anti-aircraft batteries, airfields. these are acts of war against a nation that hasn't attacked the united states of america. and, joe, where do we get the right to do something like that?
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they're not attacking our people. they've done nothing to us. i just agree 100% with what gates is saying, which is we can't afford to get ourselves involved in one more war. did you see that statement he made up there at west point? >> we did, pat. we've been talking about it. >> right. >> and we're just stunned by some members, especially the republican party, but also joe lieberman and the democratic party. >> exactly. >> their reflexive first step is to send our men and women to go fight and die in our countries where we don't have a direct stake. for 20 years we've been pursuing a wilsonian policy that makes us the world's guarantor of policy and it's not sustainable. >> if we do that, it's acts of war. suppose gadhafi starts winning?
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do we then have to go in and win the war for the rebels as well? do we get ourselves another country we inherit, try to organize and set up? it's preposterous. unless and until he does something overt, i think, against us or, you know, starts mass kerg his people, we should stay out. >> even when he massacres his people, why is it just the united states' responsibility to go there? how about the world commune in the right now we have people talking about going into libya to guarantee the shipment of oil to china. how about having the chinese help us out. we'll keep talking about libya when we come back with andrea mitchell. also i want to talk to harold ford and the rest of the table about the lead in the "wall street journal." john boehner is going there. said he's going after social security and medicare. we'll see if the president answers in kind. when we come back, politico's top stories of the morning also.
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uh-oh, mike, the guy who will call you and me a socialist willing on set, jack welch. we'll have a preview of "meet the press" with david gregory and fresh off his oscar nomination for best picture, harvey weinstein will be here. plus, our charlie sheen week in review. we'll dedicate this to mika. let's get the weekend forecast with bill karins. give us good news. >> we have a little bit, joe, it's a 50/50 weekend in many places. still a chill in the air, still need the hat, the gloves and the winter coat in most of the northeast and the mid-atlantic. today's forecast, cloudy skies for the most part, a glow of sun now and then. temperatures average for this time of year, 30s and 40s. flooding this weekend in the ohio valley, everywhere in green
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you're at risk. i said it's a 50/50 weekend. the east coast is good today, east coast is good on saturday. the bad weather is in the ohio river valley. from the carolinas up to d.c., new york and right through new england, on the east coast, saturday is your day to get anything done outdoors if you choose to do so. you're watching "morning joe," great shot there, heading down the hudson. we're brewed by starbucks. >> woman: good night, gluttony-- a farewell long awaited. good night, stuffy. >> ( yawning ) >> good night, outdated. >> ( click ) >> good night, old luxury and all of your wares. good night, bygones everywhere. >> ( engine revs ) >> good morning, illumination. good morning, innovation.
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today, march 2nd, fox news has suspended its contributeser arrangements with former house speaker newt gingrich and former pennsylvania senator rick santorum, both of whom have signaled possible runs for the president. >> if you suspend these guys
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next you'll have to suspend mike huckabee, sarah palin, john bolton. luckily this does not affect glenn beck. based on his show he's looking past 2012 and running for archduke of the post-apocalyptic afterstate. >> that's a nice crown. the suit fits very well. a tight fit. let's take a look at the morning papers. "the new york times," in a deal expected to be signed today, harvard university says it's going to allow rotc back on the campus for the first time in 40 years. mike barnicle -- >> good thing. >> glad they're back. >> "usa today," airfares are likely to keep rising with oil prices. several u.s. carriers bumped up their fares to offset fuel costs. it's the sixth widespread fare increase just this year. >> and "the wall street journal," oil giant bp has decided not to award 2010 bonuses to its former ceo, tony haywa hayward, and other top executives working in the gulf region.
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huh. of course, "the wall street journal" as we said before, john boehner has decided to weigh in on entitlements, on social security, medicare. it says the republicans will go there. now we see if the president will have similar courage to tackle the issues that have to be tackled to make this country solvent in the long run. >> a lot of people have been asking him to do it. he says he will. with us now, from politico, mike allen. hey, mike. >> happy friday. >> president obama's re-election team we're learning from politico is ramping up efforts to nail down major donations. how are the president's fund-raising efforts looking already? >> well, they're looking promising and they're much more aggressive than we had known before. politico's glenn thrash found out that he's flying around the country holding what they're calling donor listening sessions which is nicer than donor
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shakedown spepgsz they've had them in new york, chicago, they're going to texas, california, boston, florida, trying to get people to join the national finance council. willie, if you have your checkbook ready, spots are available, $61,000 a couple. donation to the dnc, that's where you start talking. >> is a billion dollars the big? that's what we keep hearing this time around. president obama may raise a billion bucks? >> that's a dumb figure by the media. it's much more than that. the president raised, last time when he was an underdog most of the time, $900 million, if you count the money he personally raids for the dnc. it will be well more than that figure, certainly going to be a $2 billion election, the first in american history. >> wow. >> that's almost obscene. >> he'll rope in all the hillary clinton donors, too. he doesn't have to fight them this time around. >> george will has a column coming out sunday on his take
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for the republicans' run for 2012. what george is saying. >> george will, conservative republican is out saying he's pessimistic about the republican party's chances in 2012. and here's the real talker in there. he says there are only five plausible gop candidates. he says the process is far advanced, there's not going to be somebody who will ride to the rescue and the candidates who could be president are romney, pawlenty, daniels -- >> barber and huntsman. >> that's it. notably absent, newt gingrich, sarah palin. notably absent from that, mike huckabee. the field is who we think it's going to be. he says the way they've been talking so far, the way that some of those candidates have been conducting themselves, it worries him. >> george wright goes on to talk about sarah palin, the rest of them, the nominee may emerged must diminished in a process
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with careless, ego maniacal majority. >> i second george's emotion. >> that's basically what you've been saying, joe, for about eight months. >> seriously. now we're back into the birthers stuff. it's just crazy. >> that was huckabee. >> let's take those five candidates. which one of those has the most energy within the republican party? >> well, he doesn't have the most energy but people would still say if they had to pick who was most likely to go the distance, it's mitt romney. the way they explain it is because of money. he will have the most money. what republican tell me is george w. bush had tough days, weeks, months, john mccain had tough days, weeks, months but they were the nominees that had the most money. mitt romney he has the biggest infrastructure. i think you can cross off mitch daniels. there's more and more signs he's not running. it may look like a contest,
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haley barbour will be very big with inside washingtons but barely cracks the meter on polls so far. >> mitt romney, is he going to be willing to write big checks again this year? >> he may not have to. if he's looking like the guy he's going to get a lot of money but yes, he could do that. >> mike allen, thanks so much. interesting, george will's piece out this weekend. coming up, how the poisoning of two century old trees on the campus of auburn university last month has had an unexpected affect on college football's biggest rivalry. we'll get into that. keep it on "morning joe." >> did you see the story "new york times" in the about that? >> yes. >> pretty cool. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro.
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i want to run a marathon. i'm going to work with kids. i'm going to own my own restaurant. when i grow up, i'm going to start a band. [ female announcer ] at aarp we believe you're never done growing. thanks, mom. i just want to get my car back. [ female announcer ] together we can discover the best of what's next at aarp.org. sweet & salty nut bars... they're made from whole roasted nuts and dipped in creamy peanut butter, making your craving for a sweet & salty bar irresistible, by nature valley. al is in dadeville, alabama. >> how you doing? >> the appointened the two
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toomer's trees. >> is that against the law to poison a tree. >> do you think i care? >> no. >> i really don't. roll damn tide. >> harvey updike called a radio show and confessed to poisoning a pair of 130-year-old oak trees at auburn's famous toomer's corners. auburn fans have rallied at the trees and something unexpected happened as report in "the new york times" and "sports illustrated." the incident brought rival auburn and alabama fans together. a new facebook page called tide for tombers has 106,000 fans and raised $50,000 to save the trees. with us now, the radio host who took that call.
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>> how much money has joe scarborough put in that fund. >> i am going to put some in there. do they think the trees can be saved? >> no, they don't. they would know at auburn. that's their specialty. >> walk people through what exactly happened here, if they're just tuning into this story. you get a weird phone call from the guy. who happens flex? >> he's upset about something that happened 28 years ago. he claims that auburn fans -- >> it's kosovo. it's kosovo here. go ahead. >> he said they rolled toomers corner the day brian died. he moves on from that and said that auburn fans put the cam newton jersey on the back of -- on the bryant statue after the alabama/auburn game and this is retaliation. we get a call from the police the next day and eventually the feds get involved thinking this might have been a terrorist act by putting the herbside into the
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water system. it all comes undone about two weeks ago. >> can you spec to the significance about the trees on campus there? >> it's almost hard for me to do so but i'll try. these trees are tan moutamount religious experience. they roll them with toilet paper after every big auburn win. >> it's absolutely disgusting. but you say -- you say on your show that alabama fans just haven't been able to handle auburn and cam newton doing well this year. >> that's what this is about. the guy's name is harvey updike. not to be crazy here but his two children -- he has four children but his first two were named crimson tyde, that's t-y-d-e and bear bryant updike. he wanted to make his third
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child allybama. do you want me to keep going. >> i'm just wondering why his ire wasn't focused where it should have been focused, and that is alabama's offensive coordinator. alabama doesn't have to blame cam newton for anything, do they? they need to blame their own coaching staff, as you said, being outcoached by les miles. do you know how tough that is? >> it's a one in a million shot. and then the auburn game, i still can't get over the stupidity of the coaching in the auburn game. they need to -- >> the bigger picture here is, you're right, i agree with you, and intelligent people do. auburn fans, alabama fans just can't get over the whole cam newton story. most people know he was ruled
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ineligible for about three minutes and declared eligible and he was the best player in college football, maybe one of the great players of all time. >> without a doubt. what can we do, people out there do, these trees were absolutely gorgeous. this is why we have you on the show here this morning. and historic, over 100 years. literally when i first heard this, it just sickened my stomach. what can alabama fans do to help here? you can't transplant 100-year-old trees here. what can we do? >> i think what's going on has been very positive, joe. i'm not trying to be an alarmist here with barnicle watching but already there are concerns. the night the story came out, police surrounded the bryant statue at the stadium. if two months nick saban is getting a statue unveiled. alabama fans fear auburn fans will retaliate. i'm not trying to re-create egypt or libya here, down here
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it's taken seriously. >> it's not egypt or libya, it's more like kosovo. thank you so much, paul. >> my pleasure. >> paul feinbaum. he's a great sports journalist. anybody that's followed him in alabama, he goes after both sides, tough. he has for 30 years, telling the truth. loathed by all, then everybody, you wake up one day and suddenly everybody loves him and respects him. they know he's going to tell the truth. >> he's the man down there. >> he really is. what a sad story. >> it is. >> what about the kids' names? >> allybama. i'll have one more daughter and name her allybama or vandybilt. brandon davies, kicked off the team. earlier this week after he admitted to his teammates having sex with his girlfriend before marriage. that's a specific violation of the mormon school's honor code. well, after their loss the other
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night, byu head coach dave rose and the star player jimmer fredette, might be the national player of the year, reacted to the punishment against their teammate. >> the way i feel about this is brandon did the right thing. and his heart's in the right place. i think a lot of people, you know, try to judge this, if this is right or if this is wrong. and that's not the issue. it's a commitment that you make. >> he told us everything. he told us that he was sorry, that he let us down. we held our heads high and told him it's okay, you know, it's something that's life. you make mistakes and you just have to play through it. >> the coach there was asked if he thought davies will play again at byu? he said, yes, i do. he handled it the right way. camming up, jack welch will be on the set with us. but first, donald rumsfeld lends support to afghan
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well, listen, the criticisms of karzai, i think are misplaced. >> all right. >> i think it's been -- >> you're a karzai fan, you like him? >> he been elected leader of that country. >> it was a rigged election. >> oh, come on. >> really? >> i've seen no indication that he's corrupt. i think the way he's been sabotaged by biden and other people criticizing him, he's the president of that country. we want him to succeed.
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>> andrea, my goodness, we need to go to andrea mitchell. welcome back to "morning joe." he got elected but there's no evidence of his corruption according to rumsfeld? has he not read the newspapers for the past six years? >> well, the intelligence reports that actually came to that administration as well as this, although he's been out of office since 2006. that's a pretty big stretch to give hamid karzai a clean bill of health, after everything that's been written about the drug wars and, in fact, his own family's connection to them. >> no doubt about it. pat buchanan, it seems to me that at the end of the day with all the problems we have in afghanistan, the worst is who our ally is there. our young men and women are fighting and dying right now. the american people right now are spending $2 billion a week to prop up karzai. a corrupt, infective leader.
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>> yes. that's expectly right, joe. i've read all the things you have. i think what's rumsfeld is saying in effect, look, this is the only guy we got. it may not be a particularly strong read but it's all we've got. if this goes down, it's all going down. for better or worse, he's our ally in this affair till the end. i don't know what rums field believes about the allegations of corruption, but i believe that's probably his basic motivation saying, look, if he goes, it all goes. if we have a chance, we'll have to stick with him. >> if that's the answer to the question, it is a stupid question, that the united states government still hasn't answered in ten years as to why we're in afghanistan. >> it
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de-mde m de-m de-minimous. >> let me agree with you on the point. that there's no doubt about it, he's very problematic as a leader but is it not valid to say, look, undercutting this guy and saying that he's corrupt or crooked and incompetent and a fool, aren't you undercutting your whole mission? and if you're going to have any chance at all, it's with this guy. now for better or worse, this is a guy we've bet the farm on and rumsfeld seems to be saying to me, look, don't undercut him because that's our last shot. >> i think -- >> andrea mitchell.
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>> i think that's the point he's trying to make and many people, frankly, in the administration are trying to make. at the same time, i think a significant fact this week was john kerry who came back and chaired a hearing on foreign relations but gang speaking out. he was on our show saying they're going to have to accelerate that withdrawal which is now projected to be 2014. i think congress is losing patience and perhaps giving political cover now to the president as they look for an exit strategy. >> our troops need to start coming hole. mike barnicle, i've been tired of vietnam analogies over the past three decades. but i'm sorry if the analogy fits, then apply it. and it's certainly looking more and more every day like it fits in afghanistan. >> joe, from november of 1963 when they were assassinated in saigon, from our withdrawal from vietnam, there were multiple
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heads of state in vietnam. in afghanistan, to pat's point, he might be our only guy. we cannot achieve our goals militarily. no nation could achieve its goals militarily without some semblance of government that can seep down to the people of the country you're in. government in a box, remember that theory in the box is empty. we have no ally, real strong ally, in afghanistan and even less so, unfortunately for us, in pakistan. it's time to get out. >> no doubt about it. andrea, you are going to be talking about afghanistan, obviously. and other such topics. >> libya. >> at 1:00 today. >> obviously libya on the top of your list. who are you going to have on your show at 1:00 p.m. >> we have dick lugar, the ranching republican from foreign relations who is one of the most thoughtful people on foreign policy on the hill. and news today that hillary clinton says there are some chance or indications that robert levenson, that former fbi
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guy who's been missing in iran for four years may ab live somewhere in southwest asia. the iranians are telling us they're working with the family. so we've got good news on that. we have the labor secretary with the jobs numbers coming out later. >> appreciate you being with us. >> you bet. >> you know what else we appreciate, willie? great news. great news. and we've been blessed this week. a cornucopia of great news coming from charlie sheen. you're going to sum it all up. >> we typically do a countdown of the three big stories. there was only one big story. you'll see all the poetic words you'll see all the poetic words of charlie sheen in one neatly wrapped package, coming up on "morning joe." ell, in that case, i better get back to these invoices... which i'll do right after making your favorite pancakes. you know what?
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oh, yes, is it time? t. is time, prerecorded mika. >> and the only reason we can get away with what we're about to do is because she's not sitting here. she would have vetoed this. there are more important events but we have charlie sheen. >> this week, charlie sheen stopped pretending he's not from mars. >> defeat is not an option. they picked a fight with a warlock. epic behavior. psychological distress, oh, my
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god. >> fools, trolls. i've been riding it on a mercury surfboard. i'm an a drug, it's called charlie sheen. >> are you clean right now? >> look at me, duh. >> sheen showed he's taken to heart president obama's message of winning the future. >> first step in winning the future -- >> duh, winning. >> maybe he's a disciple of the great vince lombardi. >> they all know winning isn't everything, it's the only thing. >> duh, winning. >> sheen brought his winning message to more than a million followers on twitter. while back on tv, america tried to follow along as he explained his feet with cbs. >> now you have your cleanup hitter and it's late august and i'm sitting on 64 bombs at 4:20, 107 driven in and we're not in the playoffs yet. >> with his tv career on the rocks, sheen reminded the country of his rather imbresive
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imdb page. >> i won best picture at 20. i wasn't even trying. >> a week after questioning the manhood of one of the founding fathers. >> i'm not thomas jefferson. he was a [ bleep ]. >> sheen cited the wisdom of another great american thinker. >> i missed practice, talking about practice, to quote the great allen iverson. practice. >> we're talking about practice, man. what are we talking about? practice? >> charlie declared himself ready to get back to work, announcing that he had healed himself of his problems with drugs and alcohol. >> i close my eyes and made it so with the power of my mined. >> what kind of a mind could cure addiction? the 10,000-year-old kind. >> i have a 10-year-old-year-old brain and the boogers of a 7-year-old. that's how i describe myself. >> wait, what? >> i have a 10,000-year-old brain and the boogers of a
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7-year-old. >> sheen swears he's high on sheen and only sheen. >> drug tests don't lie. the scoreboard doesn't lie. >> charlie walks the path of recovery with his live-in godesses, both of them only slightly older than the 7-year-old boogers. >> i don't care where the bus is going. that's how we live. you know what i mean. >> for charlie sheen this week, no apologies, just nonstop wing. >> that's fine. that's how i roll. bye-bye. there's the frickin' door. >>. speaking of winning, the author of the book "winning," jack welch on "morning joe." aug? [ laughs ] not funny. act my age? -why? -why? -why? i love the sun. past sun goddess. every line has a story.
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ultimately they know if we don't have a signed action by tomorrow, we have a legal as well as a moral obligation to send out notification to the unions foretaling that beginning the first week of april, 1,500 state employees will have to be laid off for the equivalent of $30 million worth of savings. >> we're very serious about this and they come back with going after our parking spots, extortion with our paychecks, being arrested. reallocating staff, cutting off copying privileges. we've been honest and up front
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to why we're here and what we'd like to see happen in order to move us forward. this is what we get in return. i think they should spend more time on actually concentrating the problem in wisconsin as opposed to you wasting time coming up with resolution after resolution that doesn't make any difference. >> welcome back to "morning joe." mike barnicle is with us along with pat buchanan in washington. and now with us at the table, the man who's going to challenge our union representative, mike barnicle. former ge ceo and chairman jack welch. the author of the book "winning." and was named deservedly so, the ceo of like the past 8 million years. jack, you sit at home in the morning and you watch mike barnicle talking about union bashing. what goes through your mined? what goes through your mind. >> well, i love mike and i think
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warm thoughts about mike. but i have difficulty with him not understanding the difference between a private sector union and a public sector union. >> what is the difference? >> the private sector union, the right to collective bargen is clear. the team is all trying to provide a value product and service. the customer decides what the revenues are by whether they like the product and service and the revenues come in and they're separated down and delivered by appointed people, not elected people, to the individuals. and the bargaining is straightforward, two different people, two different constituents are on each side of the table. >> right. >> in the other system, in the public sector system which should not be a union whether it be franklin roosevelt saying that, george meany saying that, there used to be editorials why
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there shouldn't be private sector unions. the revenues are made only through tax increases, imposed pont citizens and the money is handed out by elected officials. who get the dues from the people, hand them to them and they give it back to them in the form of benefits and raises. i'm not against collective bargaining, it just shouldn't occur in the public sector. >> mike, what say you, mike? >> i certainly understand the difference between negotiating public sector and private sec r sector. private sector you negotiate and n collective bargaining and you're responsible to the shareholders on the other side of the table. >> it's an arm's leng in negotiation. >> public sector, you're negotiating and the other side of the table are responsible to voters. there's an inherent conflict in the collective bargaining system when it comes to public employees union. that said -- >> we have no difference. don't say that said. stop there. >> that said, i think it is
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terribly unfair and wrong for any sitting governor, knowing what he had when he came into office, to try and literally detroit union now. that's what this guy is trying to do. >> what if he campaigned on it. >> but he didn't. he campaigned on the sensible notion in state after state. people know in state after state you have to do something to get control. the union agrees to give back unto it. >> they disagree violently until he came up with this broader approach. >> that's the bargaining process. how many times, even though you shut down the steam division in ge in massachusetts years ago, we'll let that go. how many times have you sat down with unions, aircraft or whatever and negotiated? >> do i it all the time. i do it all the time now even. i tell you this, it's a different game. the best way to look at this is to look at a speech by jon
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corzine in 2006 when he was running for governor in new jersey. he was in trenton. and he was standing on the steps in trenton with a big crowd out there. multiple union workers. he said to them, if you elect me, i'll fight every day to get you a better contract. that's a quote. he didn't have the to fight every day. he just gives it to them. >> exactly. >> that's gone on for 50 years. >> pat buchanan -- >> close to 50 now, mid-60s. >> pat, let me ask you a question. you look at what chris christie is doing in new jersey and it seems to be working very well for him politically. scott walker, of course, facing a firestorm in wisconsin. i wonder politically, is scott walker going to bridge too far? >> maybe he has. it's not too popular in wisconsin, joe. what he's doing with regard to, quote, collective bargaining. here you have a union which raises millions of dollars, uses
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phone banks and get out the vote to put its own boy in the governor's chair and then its own boy negotiates with it behind closed doors to give it all these money and benefits. the two of them laugh and send the bill to the taxpayer. that's not collective bargaining. it's collusive bargaining. it's not a healthy relationship. it's incestious. that's the difference between the united autoworkers standsing up against ford representing workers and ford representatives representing executive board and shareholders and both wanting ford to do well. >> obviously, though, the unions, i think a lot of us at this table have had unions working against our interests in the past. certainly you have to look at unions from 1945 after the war and look at the middle class that, you know, our industrial base helped build, unions sort ever helped as well. >> i'm 100% behind you.
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i'm a member of a union. i don't have to be. it's a good union, aftra. frankly i think it's a terrible thing that the industrial unions in this country have been diminished and virtually destroyed. rich corporations buy congressmen, give them enormous amounts of money and then they tell them take your factories overseas and bring your staff back here free of charge and kill your union. i'm with the unions on that one, joe. >> i have a question for you off of pat's response there. did general electric, when you were there, ceo, greatest ceo in 10,000 years, did general electric have a political action committee, a p.a.c.? >> yes, it did. >> did you contribute to various candidates? >> yes. >> did you recently asked people that have recently been laid off, did you ask them for their permission. >> i never got near an employee
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p.a.c. that was run by the employees. >> the p.a.c. was run by the employees? >> totally. totally. and given out by the employees. the ceo never got near it. if i ever got near it, every guy at nbc would have been there with a mike announcing that i have directed the p.a.c. money to someone. get out of here. i didn't touch it. never got near it. >> but the point is, though, you look at how unions continue to dwindle. private sector unions down to 7%. and we can debate about public sector unions. let's just talk for a second about private sector unions. even though you had an adversarial relationship with unions when you were ceo, that was your role, just like a union leader's role was to get as much from you as possible. we understand that. isn't it a threat to american's middle class that private sector unions dwindle the way they do? t. won't be if in fact we create
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more jobs. >> what kind of jobs, jack you? know, even greenspan says the income disparity between the richest americans and the poorest americans continue to explode. our middle class is vanishing. >> only in the last eight years, eight to ten years. we were going on a nice trajectory through the '90s. what happened here is, with the great recession and other things, we've become incredibly productive. in the long haul that's going to be good. short term that's painful. if you take the output in 2010 in this country. total output, products and services and compare it to the output in 2007, they're equal. we're now back to where we were in '07. >> right. >> we're doing it with 7 million fewer people. 7 million. >> here's another statistic for you. 20 more million people would be working today if our productivity levels in 2010 were what they were in 19923.
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we've become that much more productive. >> i agree. >> if we weren't in the global economy you wouldn't sell anything. >> right, right. >> back to my union days. i never had a strike. in 21 years. i never had a union formed in 21 years. i met with the union leaders at every location constantly and told them where we were, what we were doing, et cetera. and we had a banging heads at the negotiating table every three years but we all trusted each other. my argument always was when new unions came, you don't need a union. we'll take care of you. you don't need somebody in the middle defusing our arguments. you saw the piece in the "the post." beautiful piece. they're making $100,000 in one job, they're making $50,000 on their union job. they're working one hour a day
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as a teacher and they're working -- >> not all teachers. >> no, no, no, the union leaders. >> the union leaders that. >> are teachers. there's a whole structure in place. you know that, the steward, the steward's boss. infrastructure that's unnecessary in the competitive world. >> on the other side of it, you have teachers that aren't making a whole lot of money. they're sitting there asking why don't we have stronger representation? why shouldn't we be entitled to collective bargaining? what would you say to the teachers? >> you cannot have in my judgment, or should not have a situation where the unions are raising money, joe, and putting into office, even teachers union, people on the basis that those people will turn around and give them the pay and benefits they want at the expense of tax payers. >> so pat, who is their advocate then? >> their advocate is basically -- >> i'm saying this is a guy, just so people know, playing
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devil's advocate here, this is a guy who teachers unions were against constantly when i was in elected office. still, it begs the question. if you don't have public unions or teachers unions, who will be the advocates for teachers. >> the political leaders themselves should be the advocates for their voters, joe, there's no problem with that. let me talk about, if i could, jack and point. what's happened in america, is the simple fact that the interests of court america and the interests of the country have die verged. if general electric is building plants in the united states, that's good for america. but if they're going to make themselves more efficient by shutting down a plan the here and opening it upin china or mexico or somewhere else, that may be good for ge and shareholders and stockholders like me but it is not good for america. it does not good for the workers of america and that's what's killing these unions.
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it's republicans as well as democrats who are in the back pocket of the business roundtable, authorizing them to go abroad and produce there and export free to the united states of america. >> jack, i wonder what lessons you see in what's happened in the automobile industry in the south of this country, you have kia, toyota, mercedes, bmw, thriving, creating jobs. what do you make of the paradox between that and what's happening in detroit? >> look, there's no question. a good plant manager, a good manager, dealing with his employees fairly in a nonunion environment has more productivity. it's faster, better. you don't have somebody carrying the wrench over to turn the wrench to do this. the thing that's different in the private sector and the public sector is there are consequences for bad labor management practices. consequences for the management and consequences for labor. steel, rubber, airlines going
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bankrupt, pilots are out. managers are -- ceos are thrown out. if you don't have good labor relations, people have a right to organize. every time we had a union organizing attempt at a plant, i'll guarantee you that we had a horse's ass running the plant. those people who didn't feel they had voice or representation, we'd go out, throw the guy running the plant out and within three months the plant would be -- the union would be gone. >> let me ask you as we go to break, how do you respond to pat? talking about what's good for ge is not necessarily good for america. >> i think in general, if ge didn't move or gm or ibm or anybody else, cisco, if you don't be competitive, no consumer in america says, let me see, i'll buy this refrigerator or something from ge because it's made here.
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even though it costs $100 more than the one from samsung or lg. customers -- you can't talk out of both sides of your mouth. customers want value products at a price, high quality, et cetera. if ge stays in these high-cost plants and tries to make something, say i made it for america, buy it, they're going to say, sorry, i'm taking the one next to it that just came in from korea and barnicle is the first one to buy it. >> barnicles of the world are destroying this country. we've said it for a long time. jack, stay with us. coming up next, newt gingrich explores the possibility of a 2012 presidential run but is he any closer to throwing his hat into the ring? plus, a preview of "meet the press" with david gregory and this morning's headlines oust white house with nbc's chuck todd. first, here's bill karins. he has a check on the weekend forecast. what does it look like? it looks like sunday will be a washout in the east. first the rain has to get here.
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let's track it. today warmer than yesterday. not a bad forecast. more clouds today than yesterday. still a chill in the air in new england. as we look towards the midwest, flood warnings on rivers and now we have flood watches from buffalo down the mississippi river to memphis. that's the area of concern. already rain outside of chicago and indianapolis today. we track that rain today. kansas city, chicago, tomorrow it moves into the ohio valley, down through atlanta and new orleans and then the very wet day on the east coast, heavy rain expected from pittsburgh to new york to boston. down to washington, d.c. kind of a 50/50 weekend for most locations. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. i'm good about washing my face.
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because of our concern for
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the future of the country, our concern for our grandchildren and all of the children of this country who are faced with, i think, a very dramatic choice of which future we're going to have. we are today establishing a websi website, newtexplore2012.com. that website is up as of about an hour ago. we will look at this very seriously and we will methodically lay out the framework of what we'll do next. >> have you sent your check yet, mike? >> oh, yeah. >> newt for president. >> what was his website, newt load 2012? >> excuse me? >> with us now from washington, the moderator of "meet the press," david gregory. from the white house, nbc news white house chief correspondent, co-host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd.
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david gregory, let's start with you. the president is not taking negotiations off the table with libya. why? >> he wants to keep in check what may be a civil war that's starting to break out there and protect as many of those challenging the gadhafi regime as possible. there are increasingly bad options that are breaking out all over libya for the united states right now. gadhafi does not seem inclined to go. there are interests to the world oil market, obviously. but i think this underscores the fact that each of these countries and the revolt that's going on are different scenarios for the united states in terms of how this government tries to influence what ultimately happens. >> hey, cheuck, it was interesting to note the president in the joint press conference he had with calderon, saying the door is still open to a no-fly zone over libya when just the day before gates outlined the perils of doing that. what's the disconnect there?
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>> i actually read the president's statement as he was dragged into talking about the no-fly zone. he never said the phrase. he was asked about it twice. the associated press asked him initially in the question. he never really got to it. talked about the fact that there are going to be plenty of options on the table that reserve the right to potentially go in there militarily. and then he had a follow-up. i didn't see the president as anxious to talk about it too much. because you did hear, i think, secretary gates' very blunt assessment of the mechanics of putting in a no-fly zone. and that it is a -- you almost get the sense that gates would like to see it as an idea of almost last resort at this point versus the more bullish comments you're hearing out of the state department, about the idea or john mccain and john kerry, both of whom seem to be -- john mccain more hawkishly pushing the idea of a no-fly zone.
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john kerry, also pretty close to sharing the same position. >> david, and then chuck, too, please weigh in on what i'm about to ask. you keep hearing anecdotally out of washington that vice president biden, the greatest vice president in the history of vp vice presidents. >> ever. in the history of the world. >> giving his long relationship with the new chief of staff, bill daly, is playing an increasi increasingly critical role. i keep hearing his role is expanding in importance. what do you hear? >> well, mike, i think it's right. i think you saw the ground work for it. you're right. he's been involved in a lot of these things, particularly during the lame duck session where there was the s.t.a.r.t. negotiation or the tax cut negotiation. biden got in there and started working it, started negotiating. he's got those relationships in
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the senate. this is something he's good at. the truth is he has deeper relationships and more of an ability to work it than the president does. and sews been tasked to do that. do i see that role increasing. look, he's going to do it now. we're facing, just a couple weeks away from the very difficult task of trying to reconcile what they're going to cut from spending just this year. we haven't even gotten to the president's budget. how are they going to reck site the money this year? they have to get in there and get in there fast. i totally agree with you. it's skinned with this year, he's playing an expanded role. >> i don't think it's a coincidence after rahm emanuel left you saw joe biden take more of a public -- you see more use of him publicly or you hear about more use of him publicly than you did when rahm was there. i'm not implying there was a conflict, it's just a different style of white house that's
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being run. i concur with david. the vice president's relationships in the senate vitally important. that relationship with mitch mcconnell is what got these deals done in december. >> we have the greatest ceo of the last thousand years, jack welch with us. he has a question. jack? >> how do you take the budget seriously when you talk about $4 billion in cuts and we're fighting for months to get that done. and it costs us $6 billion a day in debt coverage every single day we don't do anything. we are having these enormous debates. you're debating with these politicians trivia in the context of the whole debt deficit issue. it's crazy. >> i don't think we're debating trivia. we're trying to get them to actually deal with the whole pie. >> a big number. >> not the trivia. the truth is they're occupying themselves with the trivia, instead of talking about whether
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it's social security or medicare or defense spending. here's why, this is it, i'm sure you dealt with this a lot, jack. a lot of people come to washington and think being right is enough. a lot of these folks do understand what the solutions are. they do know how to solve some of these problems. it's a question of political will. this is both sides. the white house right now understands that there's so much political peril going first on solving entitlement spending, their strategy is to lure the republicans into doing it first. >> right. >> so they can beat them up with it. >> let me ask you this. david, you'll be talking to daly on sunday. and chuck today, obviously you are always in front of the white house. here you have on the front page of "the wall street journal," john boehner stepping into the fray. john boehner saying social security and medicare will be tackled by this republican congress. chuck, is that a big first
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break? and will the white house respond? >> well , i was going to say in response to jack's question, too, look at the nbc/"wall street journal" poll. you understand the political consequences on this. a majority of tea party republicans don't want to see social security messed with. don't want to see medicare messed with. entitlements are still a third rail for a reason. and boehner may be willing to do this. and he may get an award on principle but the political consequences coulding great. >> do you think the white house will still be afraid to go where they need to go to balance this budget in the long run, social security, medicare, afghanistan, the pentagon? >> second term. you have to take the politics out of the equation, joe. >> joe, two words --
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>> i've been hearing for some time, david gregory, that the president was going to show courage on srs. i still had medicare. i still saw nothing. >> two words, health care. they don't want to see that movie again. it's like bush in iraq. he couldn't get social security done. he couldn't get immigration done. there are limits to political capital here. chuck's right for the first time. even beyond, getting involved in social security will have to become a lot easier than it is right now. >> wow. who do you have this weekend? >> bill daly, exclusive interview with the chief of staff. and also michele bachmann on the direction of the tea party caucus and the republican party. >> jack likes that one. >> i want to watch david go after her. >> i hope, david, also, we get some straight talk out of the white house this weekend on "meet the press" regarding afghanistan and why it is that the secretary of defense is
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telling the truth about afghanistan but nobody else there is. >> here's my question, joe, i just wonder if jack welch will live tweet the program on sunday? >> yes, he will, to his 8 billion followers. thanks a lot. chuck, thank you as well. catch chuck and savannah on "the daily rundown" at 9:00 eastern on msnbc. coming up in 2000, al gore won the popular vote but lost the white house. our next guest is on a mission to make sure something like that doesn't happen again. we'll be right back. >> woman: good night, gluttony-- a farewell long awaited. good night, stuffy. >> ( yawning ) >> good night, outdated. >> ( click ) >> good night, old luxury and all of your wares. good night, bygones everywhere. >> ( engine revs )
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>> good morning, illumination. good morning, innovation. good morning, unequaled inspiration. >> ( heartbeats ) [ wind howling ]
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with us now, let's bring in the founder of paychecks inc. you owned the sabres as a community service to luf bow until two weeks ago and sold it. >> yes, seven, eight years ago, the team was in bankruptcy because of the activities of the ownership and nobody in the buffalo area stepped up to the plate to take over the ownership of it. they had a beautiful $150 million arena that would have
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gone dark. >> i'd seen three games. >> not much of a hockey fan. >> not much of a hockey fan. i've become one. it was a seven-year experience that went very well. somebody came along who was a real hockey fan, came along, made an offer and we took it. >> the national popular vote campaign, tell us about it. >> the premises very simple. there's two of them. one, we think that the candidate that gets the most votes in a presidential race should always win the white house. candidate gets the most votes should win the white house. secondly, across the united states every vote should count equally. with the electoral process we have is not true. >> people watching might think, this is pie in the sky thinking, it's never going to happen.
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seven states have already jumped on board. you've got 30% of the electoral vote that you need. california, if jerry brown will sign a bill the legislature passed could be next. you'd be close to 50%. >> yes. california or states like new york or pennsylvania or whatever could be real tipping points. the thing that's unique about this, first of all, 75% of the voters in america want this. the efforts we're putting forth, are just a reflection of that polling. and the fact that 30% of the electoral votes need ready already there is remarkable because the person that did it, the founder of this, had very limited resources, very limited human capital but yet was able to accomplish it this in five years. >> wow. the reason why good, independent candidates would never run for president is you would never get the electoral votes. here, if you get 36, 37% of the vote you could be the next
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president of the united states as an independent. it would revolutionize our process. >> the electoral college is like a lot of things in this country. we accept it just because it's always been there, i guess. is there still a case to be made for it? what does it do for the process? >> the electoral college, most people are mistaken and think it's part of the u.s. constitution. it's not. it's nothing but a compact among the states just like they have compacts for natural resources or transportation, those types of things. so it's really not a federal decision. it's a state decision. and that's how we got to where we are today, a compact the states had and that's how we're going to change it. the people that are, say, have a tendency to be against it or concerned about it, i think it's mainly just change. they're afraid of change. they don't quite understand how it's going to affect -- i could honestly say republicans think it's going to improve the democratic situation, the democrats think it's better for the republicans. >> i was just reminded, the only
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person around the table who has ever run for president, pat buchanan. why don't we throw it to you? >> because i'm afraid of change, joe. let me ask you this. i've always been against this idea that's been proposed before. one of the reasons is we go back to the 1960 election and it's pretty well established i think, that the machine out there in chicago stole that election. and it brought out an awful lot of votes, the graveyard vote and the rest of it. the argument is with the electoral college system, okay, you can doing in like this but you can only steal one state. you get some of these machines, busing people left, right, it's a real incentive just basically to take every warm body and put it into the polls whether they know anything about what's going on or not in states, say like take california which we know will go for the democratic party. so it seems there's an insurance policy in this electoral college
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that's good for america. >> i couldn't disagree with you more. 2004, president bush had a margin over john kerry. it's a lot easier to do a demonstrated, concentrated effort like pat just described when you only have to deal with 15 battleground states. >> if you don't only have to seal pennsylvania, or ohio? >> is it bipartisan or is that one party really wanting it versus the other. >> it's a nonpartisan activity. we try to stay away from the partis partisanship. we don't try to make predictions who it's going to help or who it's not. what's important is when people wake up on wednesday morning they want to know their vote counted equally and the candidate with the most votes won and the least amount of -- >> which party is pushing the -- >> neither one. >> neither one? >> neither one.
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in fact, the founder is a registered democrat. i'm a registered republican. >> you should understand pat is still angry about 1906 because the states that nixon stole didn't add up to ill people i actually asked pat one time, i said i never-yard why nixon didn't complain about illinois. he goes, because we stole kentucky! so anyway. >> four presidents have been put into the white house with the least number of votes. >> yes. >> in our history. that's 8% of our presidential elections. >> let's hope that changes. tom, thanks so much. we're less than a half hour away from the all-important monthly jobs report number. we'll bring that to you live. up next, academy award-winning producer, harvey weinstein joins us on set. keep it right here, "morning joe." uh, laugh lines?
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hello. we are here for her. does she live here? >> she is my daughter. >> quiet, please. >> she's asleep. >> sit down, sit down. >> i don't understand. >> i'm miral shahin. >> don't worry, i'll be back soon. >> there is some misunderstanding. please, you cannot take her. she's a school child. she's innocent. she knows nothing. >> that's a scene from the new film "miral" which is being released in north america by the weinstein company. the studio is off of a huge oscar win for "the king's
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speech." >> thank you. >> great to have you here. tell us about oscar night. barnicle and i want to know, what did you do after you won. >> oscar night is one of the greatest things in the world. when you win it's way better. we went to our own party at a close called the chateau marmon. >> it was a lost weekend. we spent john lennon's lost weekend. we were there in '73. >> we went to the "vanity fair" party. something that jack welsh would get a kick out of. there are more beautiful womener with square inch than any place i've ever seen. and then you know, one of the traditions of oscar night if you win, you do the "today" show at 3:4 3:45 a.m. >> how was that. >> excellent. >> were you sober.
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>> my cast was three sheets to the wind. they are english. >> "the king's speech," obviously, the big one. tell me how are you doing? how do you pick the films? at the beginning of the process, how do you shape them? are you a guy that looks over the shoulder of your director? of your actors? are you going crazy over the edits at the end of every day, what do you do? >> in "the king's speech" case i read an amazing script. young man in my english office gave it to us. i want to pursue it, there was competition. we co-financed the movie. i was instrumental in casting mr. firth who i've done ten movies with. >> he's great, isn't he? >> the first one was called "hour of the pig." he defended a pig accused of witchcraft. he lost the case, we lost the movie.
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i did "shakespeare in love," "single man." this is the culmination of an incredible role. >> what's important for all the boys and girls who are interested in pursuing a peefs your business, it's always been the story that drives the product. it was a great story, "the king's speech". you, not crash and burned but you have tremendous success across a double decades, making all those fabulous films you just mentioned and all of a sudden it's like harvey's coming, let's cross the street. >> mike, what happened was, i left miramax, a company named after my parents, and decided to start the weinstein company. i said instead of making movies, i said i've done that, i'll delegate that to other people within the company, i'm going to be jack welch. you say, god, if he could do it, anybody could do it.
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i found out -- i bought out a clothing company, an internet company. did i all of those things. i found out i was the worst at that than ever. luckily, i decided to go back to making movies. it turned out pretty good for me. >> you overreached. "vanity fair" had a piece titled how harvey got his groove back. how did you come back from that? you realized you stretched yourself a little too thin. how do you get yourself refocused. >> i decided to go back and make movies and do what i do. i'm just a pleasant, charming person, i have that reputation an i decided to re-apply that. i was on one of these movies saying, i think this is the way we should do it. i really mean it, i don't want to hear anything about it. they thought, listen, he's an a-hole but he's our a-hole. >> how many times have you heard
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people decided to diversify, things blow up but in this case, harvey came back and he's doing better than ever. >> we all get punched in the nose but it's all how you get back on the horse. harvey got back on a bigger horse, a higher horse, a faster horse. you go prince to pig. they take you up, shoot you down. >> i guarantee you without talking to you about this, you enjoyed this win better more than any other win because when you're down, you suddenly stop every day and go, i can't believe how lucky i am. >> i won a lot of oscars over the years, thank god, not anything was as close as satisfying as this. i'm usually one of those guys who wins something and then an hour later i'm doing something else. i really tried to perfect the art of partying in this situation. i will continue to do so for the rest of my career. it's funny, i just saw
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"miral" clip. my mother called me, if you don't get involved with that movie -- >> i'll tell you, for all of us, it was a big night. no, really. i've been fighting stammering, a lot of us talk all the time about stammering. this was a big victory for us. >> the reason i fought the ratings board to get the pg-13 movie was so many kids came to us and said this movie changed my life. their dads would take them, even though it was rated a. the only reason it's rated r is because they used the "f" word to educate this guy. he improves his speech. it also gets him angry and in his anger he learns how to speak. >> "m" and "f." >> i didn't know that. >> he's talking about the "f" word, fired. >> i never used that. i wouldn't know that.
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>> that was an intriguing clip we came in on on "miral." tell us about it. >> it's a movie we acquired. it's not a movie we made. it's made by one of america's great artists, one of the world's great artists. i did a movie with him called "bosciat." this is a story of palestine told by the other side. she called herself true story g up homeless. brought to a school in 1940, a school that began in 1948. and how these kids grow up. you never see the story. those are the israelis taking her out of her house. she's totally innocent in this scene. yet, she gets whipped, you know. these are all true stories. you know, as a jewish man, myself, and dash being involved in this movie, we have had a lot of pressure to stop and for people to say don't show this. today the middle east is
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exploding. if we don't see that side of the story, we are never going to understand. we are going to be uneducated, you know, in our approach to politics and everything else. that's what i do. you know. i -- you know, besides making movies like "the king's speech," we try to do things that are, you know, push the bound zblees what's next for you? i know we were talk before and you you were talking about starting a hamburger chain coming up with this big win. you said if -- if i can win an oscar, i can do that mcdonald's thing. >> i will tell what you i learned. if i start a hamburger chain, jack welch will run it. i'm shooting a movie in new york city called "i don't know how she does it." for whatever problems i have on morale this is about working women and how they balance kids and career. i will be loved by women all over the world. >> sarah will be in it. >> sarah jessica parker.
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great cast. pierce brosnan. greg kinnear. it is terrific. comedy. >> very good. thank you. >> thank you. >> thanks. >> harvey weinstein, thank you so much. the film, "miral," opens in thaeters march 25. we are going to bring back carol ford jr. and nbc's andrea mitchell. jobs report at 8:30. [ male ann] this...is the network.
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as a nation, you know, i look back in history and some of the worst governments we have ever had, you know one of the first things they did, they went traffic trade unions? hitler didn't want unions. i'm not comparing what's happening to the workers in madison or in columbus to hitler and stalin but i am saying that the history teaches us that unions are a very positive force in society that creates a middle class and protects our freedom. >> good morning. it is 8:00 a.m. on the east coast. you take a live look at new york city. nbc contributor mike barnicle and political analyst and visit professor at nyu, harold ford jr. in washington, msnbc political analyst pat buchanan. also, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. willie geist, we like brown. he is a baseball fan. but dude, come on, man! you can't -- you can't compare
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scott walker to hitler and stalin and say i'm not comparing walker to hitler and stalin. >> full disclosure. >> we need we love them but dot, dot, dot segment. >> he just keeps going. >> he really does. >> come on man, step off the bus. you were on the sandra bulk on movie? >> i don't know her catalog as well as i should. >> "speed." this is "speed." the bus crashes. i get off at the next bus stop. we love you but come on. >> he might be having a reaction to the fact the cleveland indians are so horrible this year. he may have had a momentary, you know, deranged for a moment. they have to stop this. everybody has to stop this. >> you can't wave the bloody flag at hitler. harold ford jr., i go back -- maybe -- maybe in '95 i might
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have done that. i don't remember on the house floor, summer of love. what do you remember from the summer of love? but seriously, did you ever like compare political opponents to stalin or hitler? >> people get excited, passionate, and go overboard. he tried to step back. if you look at what he said, i'm not comparing -- >> right. but -- >> fairness, at least he said that. i think he tried to make his point -- >> i'm not going to compare scott walker to a guy that killed 30 million of his own people but -- scott walker is doing the same thing as a man that killed 30 million of his own people. >> he backed it up by -- >> i love him. he is my friend. served with him and like him still and hope he gets re-elected next year. >> what's in the water out there, andrea? >> i don't know what it is. i was trying to get -- a glass of water. i'm frayed what's in the water. could we put a moratorium on hitler, you can't say that and
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say -- i don't mean to make that comparison. >> i know. >> these are words that just can't be use. >> i know. pat buchanan, on another one of those we love him but, mike huckabee -- >> oh, man. >> what's going on with our friend mike huckabee? is he selling books? if he is selling books, that's fine. he cause as problem. i think he -- >> i think he just misspoke on the kenya thing because apparently in his book it mentions indonesia and stuff. the natalie portman, i'm not sure how she got into family way, joe, but this is -- >> i would not have -- >> this is a "murphy brown" episode. murphy brown, she got pregnant by her former husband. i couldn't understand that one. then one, as willie has been saying all morning, it is an engaged person. listen, i will tell you this. i think huckabee -- if you see
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the whole thing he said, in fact, models in hollywood that, you know, are picked up by folks in -- who can't do those kinds of things and survive, i think the point is very valid. >> yeah. i don't know what he is doing. speaking of sex -- >> uh-oh. >> -- do you guys in washington -- i don't know if the rest of you picked this up but pat and andrea, did you see it is below the fold in "the washington post," something that doesn't really surprise me, study on sex in america. study finds abstinence on rise in teens, early 20s. i have been saying for some time -- and -- sometimes just looking at my kids and their friends over the past few years, i have noticed -- in the age of pornography where a kid who -- you know, 9 or 10 is exposed to stuff we weren't exposed to, you know, until we were in college or even later, more conservative
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generation regarding sex. and here it says the number of teens and people in their early 20s who remain abstinent goes well into the early -- goes up -- close to a third, mike barnicle. this is a dramatic shift. our youth are becoming more conservative when it comes to abstinence and sex. i actually do think it is a reaction to all of those images they are bombarded with at an early age. >> i think part of it -- you put your finger on part of it. the -- the unbelievable access that kids have that everyone has to stuff on the internet from the age of 8, 9, 10 years of age. i am the wrong guy to talk to about this, joe, because i am part of a generation -- i was raised in a deep belief and taught sex is more dangerous than the third rail. don't go anywhere near it. and so -- >> so, of course, you jumped in headfirst and may be the point, pat buchanan said that.
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conservatives have been bemoaning -- you talked about a cold war. something obviously my parents were concerned about and we were concerned about growing up. but you look at this study and america's youth are becoming more conservative. william bennett talked about it some time ago. go ahead, pat. >> i think that's right, joe. i noticed what -- they are becoming more socially conservative. and traditionalists. you notice, for example, on the pro-life side, joe, they are more conservative -- >> they are. >> -- than the generation ahead of them. and maybe it is the technology -- maybe it is the -- as mike is talking and you were talking, experience of looking at their parents' generation but it seems to be a modest move in the direction of social conservatism. >> it is interesting. it cuts both ways, of course. you said this as well, pat. andrea, let me throw it to you. it is sort of a mixed message. i have been finding -- with
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younger kids that i talk to and i define kids as anybody under 47, that they are becoming more conservative on the abortion issues but more progressive on gay rights. so it is sort of cutting both ways. it is a fascinating -- fascinating trend. >> i think -- people are becoming relibertarian, if you will, on the subject of gay rights. not just young people. the data shows people across the country, it is -- really move in a very strong direction there. away from being judgmental about other people. when it comes to sex and young people, i'm probably not the best judge but -- i would think that probably the economy, the recession, the anxieties. they face a lot of thing. in college they are worried about getting through and finding a job. they may not feel as much
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freedom, if you will. >> andrea -- >> to be experimental. >> i love with you and with all due respect -- willie and i didn't think about the gdp when we were 17 years old. >> i'm just say when i'm on campus kids are asking about jobs. >> i know. i'm just -- >> if you think back to the last couple of years what they have been through. >> you know what -- bad times do make people more conservative in many ways. one of the bigger choices -- >> one of the big things that underpins this study -- i haven't -- what was there with regard to sex when we were all growing up? no matter how young you are or how old you are now, there was a mystery about it. >> there was a mystery. >> there's no more mystery about. >> it that's probably a seriously -- i think for a lot of teenage boys, the first time they may have seen back in the '60s, '70s and early part of the '80s, a female body was when they sell "playboy," when they
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were 14, 15. i mean -- so -- you take the mystery away with the gross graphic depictions that have bombarded our children since they were very young and after all, it is just -- like god -- >> or if you were in harold's class. >> those kids -- it is a -- the school master took people in to have sex and they were falling asleep. that may be what's happening. >> wow. >> joe. >> yeah. >> you know, i think mike touch owes a good point. back there certainly in -- by our generation, it was a far more important and serious matter in the '50s than it was, say, up to that sexual revolution hit the campuses in the '60s and in the '70s where it became sort of, you know, take it or it live. it wasn't as important, i think, later on as it was in those days. you know. i think maybe that's coming back. >> hey, joe -- >> we also point out teen
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pregnancy rates dipped a little bit over the last couple of years. don't get me wrong it is still eating alive parts of our country. it has dipped. >> the trends -- that's the bottom line, the trends are reversing. let's move on. i want to talk about libya, also talk about john boehner going there on the front page of the "wall street journal." before do i that, one more cultural issue we in new york are reading today and wane and you pat buchanan as the two practicing catholics here to call -- claw each other's eyes out. holy war, cuomo snubs bishops after vatican slips live-in gal pal. mike barnicle, of course, the vatican has stopped andrew cuomo or governor from taking communion. he has responded by refusing to meet the bishops when they come up to albany. this is going to be a battle. are the bishops in the right? andrew cuomo in the right? >> i think the bishops and in the catholic church, i'm a practicing catholic, have more to worry about within their own
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house rather than commenting upon what lapsed catholics, fallfall en catholics, because of his divorce, their lifestyles and can and cannot receive communion. they have quite enough to deal with regard to the sexual scandal that has just rippled through the catholic church. >> pat buchanan, what do you say? >> i'm on the side of -- i don't know if that was archbishop dole, would-be on his side because many of these -- there's -- you know, down here in washington, d.c., it is concern over catholics getting scandal to the faithful by supporting basically pro-abortion judges and pro-abortion policies. and if the clur is much going to have any moral authority it at least has to assert its standards of right and wrong and speak out when someone egregiously, if you will, is violating those standards. so i'm on the side of the bishops on this one, joe. >> what do you think? >> well -- the church,
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obviously, not only has a perfect right but the church's obligation to define morality to and to ask catholics to practice the tenants of the religion. going outside of the comment who governor cuomo is living -- is just -- please. stay out of that. >> hey, andrea, let me ask you about what's happening in libya. obviously president obama is publicly calling on gadhafi to give up power. take a listen to what the president said yesterday and then i want your response. >> unambiguous about this. colonel gadhafi needs to step down from power and leave. that's good for his country. it is good for his people. it is the -- the right thing to do. so there are a whole range of options, military and nonmilitary, that we are examining and make these decisions based on what's best for the libyan people and how can we make sure we are
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minimizing the harm to innocent civilians during this process. throughout all of this, we -- we will continue to send a clear message that -- it is time for gadhafi to go. >> andrea, talk about the president leaving the military option on the table yesterday. >> he is leaving it on the table but he's -- he did not pick up the -- reference, the question, specifically about the no-fly zone. what they don't want to do is signal this is somehow america or western initiative and permit glad after dwroy say, as he tried say, it was not a home-grown rebellion. they don't want to put their fingerprints all over it. at the same time, they want to -- have the military option to use specifically as the president made clear humanitarian and rescue operations the no-fly zone is very much a challenge for them. you heard robert gates the other day saying there has been too much loose talk about this. certainly what we heard from the state department and from hillary clinton and from u.n.
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ambassador, susan rice, was much more proactive about it. gates, admiral mullen, the pentagon does not want to take this on and nato is very resistant to it as well. demanding there is a u.n. resolution and russia and china would push back against that. it is not that easy. >> pat buchanan, where in afghanistan, we have over 100 thousand troops there, that's a war without end, 50,000 troops in iraq, u.s. troops are spread across this globe. come on. between can't police another country, can we? >> no, we can't. robert gates is making more sense than anybody in this city. he said look, what are you talking about? that would require us to hit radar sites, missile sites, these are acts of war against a nation that hasn't attacked the united states of america. joe, where do we get the right to do something like that if -- they are not attacking our people. they have done nothing to us. i mean -- i disagree 100% with what gates is say which is we
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can't afford to get ourselves involved in one more war. did you see that statement he made? >> we -- we did, pat. we have been talking about it. we are just -- we are stun ed by some members dashes especially the republican party but also joe lieberman of the democratic party, flexes, reflexive first first step is to send our men and women to go fight and die in other countries where we don't have a direct stake. it is -- it is -- we have -- for 20 years we have been pursuing the wilsonian policy that makes us the world's guarantor of stability and we can't afford it anymore. it is unsustainable. >> you know, if we do that, it is acts of war. and once you commit yourself to acts of war, suppose gadhafi starts winning? do we then have to go in and win the war for the rebels as well? do we get ourselves another country we inherit? try to organize and set up? it is preposterous.
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unless and until he does something overt i think against us or, you know, starts massacring his people, i think we ought to stay out. >> even when he massacres his people, why is it just the united states' responsibility to go there? right now we are -- we have people talking about going into libya to guarantee the shipment of oil to china. how about having the china's help? >> minutes away from the february jobs numbers. we are going to go live to the new york exchange for that. a check on the forecast of the weekend finance. >> pictures of a brush fire down in florida. it has been very warm and breezy down there. this one just outside of miami. threatening a highway but no homes. other story going on is in the detroit area. numerous accidents have been occurring. we had a light period of freezing rain an hour ago. temperature is at 32. the roads are extremely treacherous. detroit northward, areas of michigan. let's talk about the forecast as we go throughout the day in the
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east, showery weather. temperatures warm up all areas. thoyrts 40s for the most part. d.c., sneak into the 50s. we are going watch out for flood thing weekend in the ohio valley. the storms are starting this morning in indianapolis. st. louis and kansas city. then as we go throughout the afternoon and evening, they will intensify and will continue to watch the rain threat saturday. moving through atlanta and new orleans and memphis, up through kentucky and ohio. then by sunday, all the heavy rain arrives on the east coast. could be one to two inches of rain for much of new england. even areas to have snow packs, we will worry about flooding in the ohio valley today and saturday and new england sunday and monday. you are watching "morning joe" white house style brewed by starbucks.
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and still no one knows the sun life financial name. 145 years of financial stability that changes today. i hear you're the clown in charge. so, cirque du soleil becomes... ...cirque du sun life. because soleil means sun.... (gibberish) i'll take that as a yes... sooner or later, you'll know our name. sun life financial.
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look, i only met him once. >> what do you mean once? >> did he find you online? >> wait. who did you meet once? >> paul. >> who is paul? >> i met him with joan. >> i why was joannie there? >> she set it up. >> who is paul? >> our sperm donor. >> did you think i was gay? >> no. no way. >> of course not. >> that was a scene from the oscar nominated film "the kids are all right." with us now, the chairman and ceo, peter, author of the new book "tell to win."
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thank you so much for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> that's how you move people in the end. i mean, everybody always to -- what was the secret of reagan? what's the secret of clinton? telling stories. to connect. >> actually, you know, stories aimed at the heart. not at the wall or the feet. that's what hits everyone. in my business, you don't aim at the heart. the story is the center part of all human beings. think about this show. it is all stories. you think about everything that you do of your life you remember, it is stories. one of the saddest things about alzheimer's disease is you lose your stories. your memories of your life. who are you? stories are the emotional transportation and move people back. >> all right. let's talk about stories. tell us a story in your life about how being able to tell a story moved you to where you wanted to be. how has it impacted your life? >> i'll tell you a quick story that showed me how to manage people in a business and jack welch will probably like this
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story. early in my career, i was just out to lunch. it was too much for me. i was 28 years old and didn't know what i was doing, truth be told. one night i was invited to dinner at jack warner, the -- the owner of warner brothers. and -- i went to his house and there was fred astaire there and jimmy stewart there. cary grant. i was wait for the fraud police to pull me out. i was sitting there. trembling like a mouse. finished the dinner. jack said you were quiet. i'm overwhelmed with my work. everybody is dropping the problems in my lap. i'm just crazy. he said let me tell you a story, kid. you said you are a zookeeper. you live in a zoo. everybody is going to come in that office and everybody will come in and with a problem. and the problem will be a monkey. your job is to make sure you recognize they got that monkey. don't let them leave the problem there. otherwise you will have monkey
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poop and monkey business all over your office at the end of the day. you take the person by the ear and walk them to the door and send them out and said don't come back until the monkey is trained. that's what he taught me. >> take it with you. >> right. it served me well. that's -- administrative business style that you had to do. otherwise you were overwhelmed by everything. >> yeah. >> so -- how do you explain the fact that fewer people than ever, you know, get in their cars and go out literally to a movie theater to see movies and -- is it the lack of good stories or the beginning of middle and an end? is it because there's so much out there? >> you is have two forces at work. jack would know this. you have a giant company that can make these small films because they make little small films like "the kids are all right" and $18 million. whoopie. that kid moved it. giant overheads and get enormous overheads and they are global companies and have to serve the world. what happens is that they --
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don't want to have their accent on the wrong syllable. they want to aim at the big piece of business there and make sure that they can serve that international market. what happens is action, you know, big plot, men in spandex, young audience, go for that and go for the sequels and remakes and got to go for the franchises and can't put a new business on every single week. they have to try to build those enterprises. where they aim, they are amg internationally. domestic markets $10.2 billion, international markets, $20.2 billion. >> three months you get an international box office. >> joseph levine from boston. "tourist," gigantic overseas but flop here. >> we are surrounded by boston guys. we are going to have to -- frightening. he grew up in chestnut. >> look at the ring.
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ask him about the ring. >> oh, oh, he is wearing a yankee ring. >> partners with the yankees and single a in staten island. they won the world series. >> boston guy wearing a yankees ring. >> only in new york. look. in boston they remove it. they remove your finger. gone. >> you got -- you have other great stories in the book that -- the collection of talent in there from magic johnson to the dalai laum a fidel castro in there. >> imagine them in one room. >> what's the strand running through these stories? >> these folks, whether it is good reason, bad reason, whatever political side of the spectrum you are on, they recognize story is the language of -- to move people to action. facts and an littics and data, that's great.
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unless it is metabolized in your audience you will never move their feet or wallet. the truth is the key about story is it is the one thing that's paid forward by your audience. they tell your story forward. they can't tell you facts and figures forward. it is a magic instrument. mostly abandoned by business people because they feel more comfortable with data facts. >> what's the thing that -- through generations, realities here -- the new generation is different from the last generation. i think -- for the most part, i think it is bs. humans are humans are humans. what's the bottom line, what's the foundation of a great story that moves people. what's the payoff for most of your audience members. what do they want? >> from a film position -- >> i'm talking from life. >> what they want is to feel alive and feel emotion and conflict and challenge. they want to be not -- they don't want to be passenger. they want tore a participant. feel it, touch it, palpable and feel their aliveness. that's what story gives to you. we are wired that way.
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40,000 years. we are not digital creatures. we are analog creatures. it is a digital world. the key is the oohs and ahhs. >> any business ceo is we were going, we have to win. we have to do this. they leave out the most important part of it. what's in it for me? you have to be able to translate if you do this and had this and this is what you will get. >> it is not always financial. >> no. job security. >> achieving great things. >> right. >> it is every level what peter just said. 30 years, like five column as week for "the boston globe." the two things that would govern me, you have to get them in the lead up top. hook them right up top. then you can either make them laugh, make them cry. don't try to make them think. that will come. >> hits are born here and flops are born here. hits here, flops. you have to remember that.
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you have to be audience centric. what's in it for them? if you are not audience centric you are not going get their attention. >> are you a boston fan or yankee fan? >> my heart is with boston and my wallet is with new york. >> there you go. hold on. >> you just said it. >> you are cheering for a team that has to buy championships where we red sox fans -- >> shhh. >> listen. don't say anything, okay. forget this offseason. >> signed a backup catcher for the dodgers. you made $150 million. we are a humble underdog. >> you are still $50 million short of your payroll. >> what's the vegas odds? >> thank you for being with us. "tell to win." nice endorsement up top by president bill clinton. hope to see you soon. coming up next, new monthly job
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♪ new monthly job numbers out now. let's go to cnbc's mark haines. he's live in the new york stock exchange. we have been sitting around the table here talking about how
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these numbers, especially the -- absolutely meaningless. since we have devalued the why don't you tell us what it is. 8.9. that's reason for celebration, right, mark? >> well if you are going to do this, what do you need me for? >> jack welch, we do love him. is he not great? sensitive but great. >> hey, mark, look at that rate, 8.9%? they added a bunch of jobs. thanks for dropping by, mark. >> mark, let's start this again. welcome back to "morning joe." let's go to the new york moyng, mark haines. he will tell us what the jobs rate is. mark, we are sitting here with bated breath wondering, what's the jobs rate this month? >> i want to underline the generational difference here -- you don't think the generational difference, there is. okay. numbers are good. in fact, unequivocally a good
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report. total new jobs, created 192,000. but the news gets better. the government, state and local governments, lost 30,000 jobs. so private sector growth was 222,000. >> that's great news. >> that's a great number. more good news. we added 58,000 new jobs on revisions to january and december. so you have really got a net change here of -- 300-i beg your pardon. 270,000 new jobs. this is the biggest number since may of 2010 and the rate, as we talked about last month, that's politically important if not economically important, fell to 8.9%. just two months ago that was 9.4%. so -- but there's -- just like in the past, there have been numbers that you could not sugar coat. this is an excellent, excellent,
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report. and the futures are down on the news. but that's largely because everyone expected this. we had a big gain yesterday, as you know. almost 200 minutes on. great, great news on the jobs front, joe. >> jack welch, top number we are showing on our breaking news banner, 8.9%. political number. that's very good for president obama. bottom number, 192,000 jobs added? you add on top of that the fact that we -- lost public sector jobs and we are still strong. that's really good news. >> hey, what do you think about qe2, will this good news slow down the qe2? will we stint run it all the way through? >> oh, god, i hope it slows it down. >> so do i. >> you know, we don't need dashes especially now, seems clear to me we have grown beyond the point we needed the
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government stimulus. i'm not saying we need to take the punch bowl away. but it seems to me that these numbers show we don't need the government prodding it along anymore. get the hell out of the way. let the economy, you know, from capitalism do what it is going to do. which is create new jobs if you give it a chance. >> all right, mark. speaking of the punch bowl, you go to the punch bowl, take a drink, swallow what you are eating and we are going to go to pat buchanan and keep the camera on him while he is asking you a question. >> this is unbelievably good news. as you said, net of 280,000 new jobs. you have been hearing this talk of creeping possibility of inflation. you just sort of referenced it with the fed. do you think that is a problem down the road? >> depends on how far down the road you talk about. yes, sure, it is. the imf is saying -- particularly in the commodities amarine a imf warned today, u.n. warned yesterday, about the
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global increases in food prices. this is a very bad sign. companies are experiencing higher and higher costs which so far they available to pass along. yes, i think inflation is -- is waiting in the wings. it is not what we have had before driven by higher wages at demand driven spiral. this is a slide-driven inflation coming along. either way it is not good. >> all right. mark haines, thank you so much for being with us. that is some great news. have a great weekend. >> all right, you, too. >> all right. coming up, don't miss willie's charlie sheen inspired week in review. a man that charlie should talk to. tim keller and much more with jack welch and pat buchanan. i'm good about washing my face.
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straighten up. with us now the founder new york's redeemer presbyterian church, reverend keller. author of the new book "kings cross the story of the world in the life of jesus." thank you so much for being with us. tim, have you written quite a few books. talking about this one. and why did you write it? >> this is a book with a broad appeal. it is not written to any one kind of person. presenting a story of who jesus is from the gospel mark. and p in spite of the fact almost every branch of the christian church today lost cultural credibility, there's still a tremendous amount of jesus appeal. people still find him fascinating. just an effort to try to go back to the original, the oldest of the gospels, oldest eyewitness account we have. and just let the text speak. in my case, i was trying to get out of the way. >> did you succeed? >> i don't know. you know, there is a place
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where -- supposedly was conducting the new york's -- the -- nbc philharmonic and he -- it was so incredible. there was beethoven's fifth that the whole orchestra got up to try on to give him asxlaus he tried to yell and wave arms and said it wasn't me, people. it was beethoven. he was trying to say -- i'm trying to get out of the way of this incredible material which just the gospel of mark. >> it is material that's been told for 2,000 years. what is somebody going to get from "king's cross" when they pick it up they haven't gotten before? >> i would say in the last generation, most depictions of jesus tend to spin it -- in other words, because he is so popular, it is very hard not to try to recruit him to be your poster boy. for whatever you are trying to push. >> it is the right or the left. >> yeah. >> or -- whatever political --
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>> i actually was trying to -- trying to be unvarn i shalled. i was trying to piece away -- i was trying to sort of pull away the layers through which most americans think about jesus and say what was the actual jesus that turned the original roman world upside down. >> what was it? what was the essence of it we americans don't understand? >> part of it was who he was. and part of it was how he lived. what he said was i'm god. which is -- he said i'm going to forgive sins and i will judge the world. on the other hand he lived like mother teresa. ordinarily, people who claim to be god and we have had people like that don't live like mother teresa and people that are as beautiful and as kind and as humble as mother teresa don't claim to be god but he brought the two together which made him unique. and i -- people who believe in him because they say yes, he is who he said he is, end up getting into their lives of an
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approach to truth at the same time talking about this a couple of weeks ago, still believe in truth but at the same time it makes you a kind person and not an absolutist because jesus died for his enemies and it is -- real problem is the relativists are nice but don't have truth. the truth bearers have truth but they are not very kind. jesus brings them together. himself. he's mother teresa and saying he's god. >> if you ask most people about -- in america about christians, what's a christian? for nonbelievers, we will talk about people being judgmental. and yet, it is jesus who says forgive 77 times seven. don't look at the speck in the other person's eyes when you have a plank on your own. where has the church gone wrong? when did this movement start in america? >> two parts to the answer. one part is the -- christian's fault. that's a lot of us actually --
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everybody who believes in something is never completely true to it. to some degree, we say here is what we believe but then we actually put on the shelf and don't live in accordance with what jesus taught. the other part is, no offense to anybody here, the media -- it is news when christians are judgmental. it is not news when they are acting like mother teresa usually. >> that's not a great headline, is it? >> no. therefore i would -- >> christian quits medical practice and moves to kenya. you don't see that on the front page of "the times," do you? >> ask it happen as lot. >> it happen as lot. >> a there is a little bit of that i think actually -- the bad side christians get. >> i tell the story, mike barnicle my wife and i spent the first month after katrina in biloxi. the surrounding areas. you know what group was the most remarkable? pat robertson's group. the kids were spread out all over the place and delivering water when the government wasn't there. they were delivering dipers to
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kids that are walking without diapers for three days. doing extraordinary things. not one -- not one article written about pat. but pat robertson said something a little loony and it is on the front page of every website. >> good news doesn't sell. that's why we don't print good news. christ's story, christ's appeal, do you think it's -- lasting impact -- increasing impact at n some types, has anything to do with the culture? ask you this because a new ipad2 out. we live in such a does posable culture. old ipad thrown out. christ lasted 2,000 years. >> yeah. it is also universal because he's -- christianity is growing in the world. it is growing everywhere. so it is no one culture that's interested in him. it is kind of transcultural. every cultural has a particular reason why it is interested in christ. >> all right. tim keller, thank you so much for being with us again. we hope you come back. >> if you ask me. >> not so sure. okay. we will get you back. the book is "king's cross the
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story of the world in the life of jesus." copd makes it hard to breathe
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ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. ♪ yes. we are well aware there were downright historic events happening from tripoli to madison, wisconsin, this week. the story that really touched lives and moved markets, charlie sheen's story.
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we give you now the week in sheen. >> try to pretend like i'm not special, i'm trying to pretend i'm not a rock star from mars. >> this week charlie sheen definitely stopped pretending he's not from mars. >> it is not an option. warlock. epic behavior. psychological distress. oh, my god. fools. trolls. >> i have been riding on a mercury surfboard. it is called charlie sheen. >> are you clean now? >> look at me. duh. wow, winning. >> around the clock parade of exclusive interviews, sheen showed that he's taken to heart president obama's message of winning the future. >> first step in winning the future -- >> duh, win. >> or maybe charliey a disciple of the great vince lombardi. >> they all know winning isn't everything. it is the only thing. >> duh. winning. >> sheen brought his winning message to more than a million followers on twitter. while back on tv, america tried
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to follow along as he explained his fight with cbs. >> it is late august. i'm sitting on 64 bombs and 420. you know, 170 driven in. we are not even in the playoffs yet. >> with his tv career on the rocks, sheen reminded the country of his rather impressive imdb page. >> i won best picture in 20 and not even trying. >> the week after questioning the manhood of one of our founding fathers. >> i'm not thomas jefferson. he was a beep. >> sheen cited the wisdom of another great american thinker. >> i missed practice. we are talking about practice. to quote the great allen iverson. practice. >> we are talking about practice, man. what are we talking about? practice? >> charlie declared himself ready goat back to work. announcing he healed himself of his problem was drugs and alcohol. >> i -- i -- closed my eyes and made it so with the power of my mind. >> what kind of a mind could
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cure addiction? the 10,000-year-old mind 10,000-year-old brain and the boogers of a 7-year-old. that's how i describe myself. >> what? >> 10,000-year-old brain and boogers of 57-year-old. >> despite statements of what made moammar gadhafi look like a voice of reason -- sheen swaers he's high on sheen and only sheen. >> drug tests don't lie. scoreboard doesn't zbli charlie walks the path of recovery with his live-in goddesses. both of them slightly older than those 7-year-old boogers. >> i'm not the boss. i don't care where the boss is going. that's how we live. >> for charlie sheen this week no apologies. just nonstop winning. >> that's fine. that's how i roll. bye-bye. there's the door. duh. winning. ♪ wild thing >> scoreboard doesn't lie. up next, what, if anything, did you learn today? [ woman ] nine iron, it's almost tee time.
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welcome back to "morning joe." willie, we are standing over here, right? people are pointing at me. right? i'm feeling like -- i can finally make it. i-found out that they are from the harvard business school and i realize that it has nothing to do with me! it is street t studio of the century, jack welch. what have you learned today, willie? >> they just

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